616.234.5000

Paige Winkler, Ph.D.

Paige Winkler, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral fellow, Lü Laboratory
616.234.5319

Biography

Dr. Paige Winkler earned her B.S. in zoology and her Ph.D. in genetics from Michigan State University, where her work focused on identifying the genetic causes for several conditions in dogs and developing tools to help identify genetic abnormalities. Following her doctoral studies, she worked in Ceva Animal Health’s Scientific Services Investigative Unit analyzing clinical and environmental samples using an array of microbiological and molecular techniques. In 2017, she joined the laboratory of Dr. Wei Lü at Van Andel Research Institute as a postdoctoral fellow.

 

 

 

 

 

Current research focus

Dr. Winkler’s postdoctoral research focuses on the structure and function of membrane proteins important for normal cellular processes as well as cellular pathologies. Utilizing methods in protein expression, purification and cryo-electron microscopy enables the capture of high-resolution structural information from the target proteins and their associated ligands. Understanding the structure of these proteins can provide information for therapies and drug targets for human diseases.

Education & Training

Technician II, Scientific Services Investigative Unit, Ceva Animal Health  

Ph.D. in genetics, Michigan State University
Thesis: CNGB1 mutation in Papillon dogs: The identification, characterization and cure

B.S. in zoology, Michigan State University

A.S.A. in science and arts, Northwestern Michigan College

 

 

Awards & External Funding

2015
Outstanding Student Award
Genetics Graduate Program, Michigan State University

Dissertation Completion Fellowship
College of Natural Science, Michigan State University

College of Veterinary Medicine Endowed Research Funds Grant, Michigan State University
Identification of the genes that cause two types of retinal dystrophy in Papillon dogs

College of Veterinary Medicine Endowed Research Funds Grant, Michigan State University
Identification of the genetic region of geriatric onset laryngeal paralysis polyneuropathy in Newfoundlands

2014
Canine Health Foundation, American Kennel Club

Ph.D. Continuation Fellowship
College of Natural Science, Michigan State University

2013
Student Award Winner for abstract titled Identification of a mutation in CNGB1 causing progressive retinal atrophy in Papillion dogs

Best Poster Presentation (Ph.D. Student) for a poster titled Oculocutaneous albinism in white Doberman pinscher dogs
Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine Phi Zeta Research Day

Deyanne Miller Scholarship, Portuguese Water Dog Club of America (also awarded in 2010 and 2012)

2010
College of Veterinary Medicine Endowed Research Funds Grant, Michigan State University
A search for the gene underlying Entlebucher urinary syndrome

 

Publications

To view a list of selected publications click below.

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Winkler PA, Davis JA, Petersen-Jones SM, Venta PJ, Bartoe JT. 2016. A tool set to allow rapid screening of dog families with PRA for association with candidate genes. Vet Ophthal.

Svensson M, Olsen L, Winkler PA, Petersen-Jones SM, Bergstrom T, Garncarz Y, Narfstrom K. 2015. Progressive retinal atrophy in the Polski Owczarek Nizinny dog: a clinical and genetic study. Vet Ophthal 19(3):195–205.  

Winkler PA, Gornik KR, Ramsey DT, Dubielzig RR, Venta PJ, Petersen-Jones SM, Bartoe JT. 2014. A partial gene deletion in SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs. PLoS One 9(3):e92127. 

Dawson-Baglien EM, Winkler PA, Bruewer AR, Petersen-Jones SM, Bartoe JT. 2014. Isolation and cultivation of canine uveal melanocytes. Vet Ophthal 18(4):285–290.

Winkler PA, Ekenstedt KJ, Occelli LM, Frattaroli AV, Bartoe JT, Venta PJ, Petersen-Jones SM. 2013. A large animal model for CNGB1 autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. PLoS One 8(8):e72229.

Winkler PA, Bartoe JT, Quinones CR, Venta PJ, Petersen-Jones SM. 2013. Exclusion of eleven candidate genes for ocular melanosis in Cairn terriers. J Negat Results Biomed 12:6.